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Share the Wealth of Health Are you a follower of the grain? Have you been searching for health and happiness and found it? Still searching? Come share your experiences with other macro followers.

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Old 10-20-2017, 08:14 PM   #1
Ludlum'sDaughter14
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Default A Macrobiotic Library

I've considered doing a post on this before, but it came up today in conversation, so now I have an excuse. I've accumulated a small library on macrobiotics, so I'm going to list the books I have and discuss which ones are helpful for which purposes. *Note: I haven't read all of them in their entirety, but I've read at least part of all of them, so I have a basic idea of what they contain. If you have read any other books you've found helpful, feel free to post a review as well.


*****

- Confessions of a Kamikaze Cowboy (Dirk Benedict)

This is a courtesy mention, because if you're a member here and interested in macrobiotics, chances are you already have this book. A real-life illustration of how a macrobiotic lifestyle can drastically improve your well-being. Plus it's written by Dirk, so it tends to be entertaining.


- The Book of Macrobiotics (Michio Kushi)

This book describes the philosophy of macrobiotics and its accompanying applications to life and health in great detail. Probably too detailed for an introduction to macro, but great for a comprehensive understanding of the principles and ideas. It also goes into not only the ideal proportions of the food you eat and the reasoning behind it, but how diet affects our bodies and our minds and what changes will help your specific conditions. If you want to really dig into macrobiotics for the long haul, you should get this book.


- Modern-Day Macrobiotics (Simon G. Brown)

If you're looking for recipes in categories and techniques in bullet-point lists, this book is for you. It boils down a lot of the information into a concise, cookbook-style form for easy reading and application. The author is from the UK and writes from his more Western experience of macrobiotics, so there are a few areas in which he differs from traditional practitioners (such as including potatoes in a couple recipes). However, this is a good book for those just starting to understand and apply macrobiotics, especially because each food and recipe is paired with a description of which direction(s) the energy will go.


- Macrobiotic Cooking for Everyone (Edward & Wendy Esko)

This book has even more recipes, and opens with a slightly more focused description of yin and yang and food. Lots of recipes for every major category of food, and they're all traditional. I've tried several, and have had good results each time. Would recommend this book for anyone who is even slightly committed to macrobiotic cooking to have on hand.


- Your Face Never Lies (Michio Kushi)

As I said in my lengthier review of this book, it's just what it claims to be: "An Introduction to Oriental Diagnosis." If you're curious about how our internal state is reflected in our external appearance, this very short book will give you enough information to partially satisfy your curiosity. But if you're like me, you might still be curious enough to get this next book...


- Your Body Never Lies (Michio Kushi)

This one is subtitled, "The Complete Book of Oriental Diagnosis." It goes through the traditional Eastern methods of analyzing every area of the person - physically and spiritually - to diagnose and treat disease and disorder. This book has everything you ever wanted to know and then some. If "Your Face Never Lies" unnerved you, this book certainly will. Which is where the next book comes in.


- Macrobiotic Home Remedies (Michio Kushi, with Marc Van Cauwenberghe, MD)

This book features traditional macrobiotic remedies for the majority of ailments common to humanity. It describes the energy of different foods and includes recipes for dishes, drinks, compresses, and other treatments to target specific areas of the body for specific purposes. If you want to start using natural treatments, including foods you eat, for common sicknesses as well as underlying physical conditions, this is the book to get.


EDIT: I was told by our friendly neighborhood webmaster (wow, that pun really wasn't intended ) that the following book was worthy of inclusion on the official list, and I completely agree. It has now been relabeled from honorable mention to rightful listing.


- Sugar Blues (William Dufty)

This one isn't technically about macrobiotics in name, but the application is there. This book is essential if you want to understand just how much our current intake of refined sugar is wreaking havoc on our individual and collective health. Seriously. You will freak out, but you will be better for it. I need to reread this book soon.

*****


Well, there you have it. And now I've been reminded I have some reading to catch up on...
__________________
"The tantalizing discomfort of perplexity is what inspires otherwise ordinary men and women to extraordinary feats of ingenuity and creativity; nothing quite focuses the mind like dissonant details awaiting harmonious resolution."
- Brian Greene

Last edited by Ludlum'sDaughter14; 10-25-2017 at 06:29 PM..
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Old 11-21-2017, 07:10 AM   #2
Wobbly Pat
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Very interested in this. I have reached the end of what western medicine can do for me, and looking for other ways to help myself. I have recently taken up .yoga and Shiatsu, but the idea of a macrobiotic diet fascinates me. Unfortunately I have a very sceptical husband, and as I have to rely on him to eat, life could become very complicated. Can you help with some ideas?
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Old 11-21-2017, 09:13 AM   #3
Ludlum'sDaughter14
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

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Very interested in this. I have reached the end of what western medicine can do for me, and looking for other ways to help myself. I have recently taken up .yoga and Shiatsu, but the idea of a macrobiotic diet fascinates me. Unfortunately I have a very sceptical husband, and as I have to rely on him to eat, life could become very complicated. Can you help with some ideas?
I understand what that's like. My dad is like that. The nice thing about macrobiotics is that you can make it very practical for your lifestyle. If you like Asian food it's not too hard to do without making your loved ones think you're going off the deep end. I'd recommend starting by incorporating brown rice, whole grains, and beans and vegetables regularly into your meal plans. Stir fry is one good way to do this. The key is to eat a healthier balance of food groups, which generally means a higher proportion of whole grains and vegetables. There are recommended percentages, and if you want I can give you the exact numbers when I get home. If you want more recipes, the books I listed will give you an idea of more resources you could get. Hope that helps!
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Old 11-21-2017, 12:17 PM   #4
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Thanks for your very prompt reply. Unfortunately what I did not make clear is that I cannot do any cooking. I have very compromised mobility and cannot stand for more than a few seconds. Also, my trigeminal nerve is dead, giving me a numb face, mouth and throat, and difficulty swallowing, so nuts and any hard food is out of the question. I will source some of the books, but the best I suppose I'll be able to do is to add some healthy options.
I do have porridge or muesli for breakfast!
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Old 11-22-2017, 03:41 PM   #5
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

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Thanks for your very prompt reply. Unfortunately what I did not make clear is that I cannot do any cooking. I have very compromised mobility and cannot stand for more than a few seconds. Also, my trigeminal nerve is dead, giving me a numb face, mouth and throat, and difficulty swallowing, so nuts and any hard food is out of the question. I will source some of the books, but the best I suppose I'll be able to do is to add some healthy options.
I do have porridge or muesli for breakfast!
Ah, I see. Porridge and muesli are good, since they will give you the nutrients from grains. And stir fry is far from the only way to get vegetables. Personally I would recommend trying hummus, which is chickpeas mixed with tahini (from sesame seeds) and pureed. It's one of my favorite foods, and although people often use it as a dip, I enjoy eating it by itself. It should be available in your local grocery store. Soups are also an excellent way to get the right nutrients - you can customize the soup depending on what you need nutritionally, and you can cook the vegetables very soft or puree them. Also, squash or pumpkin soup are excellent options. Squash in general is a very versatile food and usually ends up being soft and easy to eat no matter how you cook it. Your husband can probably find prepared soups at the store if he does not want to cook from scratch.

The main issues with our modern diet are (1) not enough essential nutrients and (2) too much sugar. Plus we eat too much protein and empty carbs (white bread/refined flour). If you can try to eat foods without added sugar and make sure you're getting enough vegetables and whole grains, i.e., a balanced selection, that should help you to start eating macrobiotically. You can prepare the foods however you need to in order to eat them - the nutritional variety is key. If you want more ideas for food options (remember, you don't have to go exactly by the book in order to benefit), I'd recommend Simon Brown's Modern-Day Macrobiotics to start. You might also read Sugar Blues for more information on added sugar in the diet, the havoc it wreaks on our bodies, and how to live without it.

Again, I hope that is helpful. I'm a newbie at macrobiotics, but I've done a lot of reading and some experimenting, so this is what I've come away with so far. If you have any more questions, just let me know! And other members may weigh in on this thread as well.
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- Brian Greene
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Old 11-25-2017, 02:13 PM   #6
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Smile Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Thanks again.
I have just had my first minor success with my sceptical husband with his diet. I have just made a soup containing at least 50%whole grains, then a glorious mixture of local, seasonable vegetables. - he loved it!
love Pat.
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Old 11-25-2017, 02:50 PM   #7
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Nice to hear that, Wobbly Pat. This is a wonderful start !!!! Cooking healthy food is a learning process. You will find dishes you truly like and some you'll dislike. But there are plenty of dishes you can prepare with whole grain and veggies. You can find lots of awesome recipies, but I also love to experiment a bit myself
I have been on this MB journey for a while now and truly like it, but I'm still discovering new things. I hope you'll have fun with it as well.
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Old 11-25-2017, 03:14 PM   #8
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

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Thanks again.
I have just had my first minor success with my sceptical husband with his diet. I have just made a soup containing at least 50%whole grains, then a glorious mixture of local, seasonable vegetables. - he loved it!
love Pat.
That's really cool! It sounds delicious and it's definitely got the right kind of nutrients. So glad your husband enjoyed it! Maybe this will help him to see that eating healthy can be a treat with just a little planning and prep. Having had similar experiences with my family members, I'm very excited for you!
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- Brian Greene
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Old 11-25-2017, 06:58 PM   #9
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wobbly Pat View Post
Thanks again.
I have just had my first minor success with my sceptical husband with his diet. I have just made a soup containing at least 50%whole grains, then a glorious mixture of local, seasonable vegetables. - he loved it!
love Pat.
That is so awesome. You can get some really good advice here and LMD is correct, you can customize it to what works for you.
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"If you don't know what to do, do nothing. If you don't know what to eat, eat nothing." My favorite quote. If only I can get this in writing. To be fair, the discussion that preceded the quote was about not settling because you don't like your choices. You should find a good choice for you.


"Anybody who goes to bed the same day they got up is a quitter."
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Old 11-28-2017, 07:22 AM   #10
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Thankyou so much. My little success gives me the will to go on. Also. I don't know if it is the yoga, shiatsu, the amended diet or a combination of all three but I feel better than I have done for years. All this is happening as I am in the process of reducing my medication which is always a trial
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Old 11-28-2017, 07:56 AM   #11
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I'm so happy to read that you're feeling so much better already !!!
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Old 12-02-2017, 05:19 AM   #12
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Thanks. It's still working!
I am managing to add more and more beans and lentils to our diet. The cold weather helps as we eat lots of home made soups. Even I, with my balance problems, can manage to make them.
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Old 12-03-2017, 07:14 PM   #13
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

That's wonderful news! Warm soup on a cold day is a lovely combination.

If you come across any good soup recipes that you'd like to share, I'd love to see them. I've had an especially bad flare-up of my IBS for the past week, so I'm going back to my "strict" diet, which includes eating vegetables that are well-cooked. I'm looking for wholesome and easy soup recipes and found one for squash soup I'd like to try this week if I have time. If it's good, I'll create a thread for it in the Recipes section. So if you want to post any recipes that you've tried, feel free to do so!
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Old 12-04-2017, 09:53 AM   #14
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I am now the proud owner of "The Book of Macrobiotics" by Kushi in Dutch
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Old 12-04-2017, 08:02 PM   #15
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I am now the proud owner of "The Book of Macrobiotics" by Kushi in Dutch
Awesome! Really cool that you found it in Dutch as well. I'd love to hear what you think of it when/as you read it. Finishing it is on my to-do-very-soon list.
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:31 PM   #16
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Awesome! Really cool that you found it in Dutch as well. I'd love to hear what you think of it when/as you read it. Finishing it is on my to-do-very-soon list.
Sure, no problem. I'll let you know.
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Old 12-05-2017, 12:28 PM   #17
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That's wonderful news! Warm soup on a cold day is a lovely combination.

If you come across any good soup recipes that you'd like to share, I'd love to see them. I've had an especially bad flare-up of my IBS for the past week, so I'm going back to my "strict" diet, which includes eating vegetables that are well-cooked. I'm looking for wholesome and easy soup recipes and found one for squash soup I'd like to try this week if I have time. If it's good, I'll create a thread for it in the Recipes section. So if you want to post any recipes that you've tried, feel free to do so!

I wish I could! Unfortunately one of my 'challenges' is that I find it difficult to scan when I am reading, so trying to follow a recipe book is too much like hard work. I do tend to experiment with recipes though. If I do make a soup that is particularly good though, I will share it with you.
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Old 12-12-2017, 02:35 PM   #18
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

I was feeling very smug today when I produced a soup which seemed to tick all the macrobiotic boxes. High in grains, bought from a registered organic shop.
Lots of home grown vegetables and herbs, cooked with no oil or fat of any description.
I then (belatedly) read my macrobiotic guidance, and discovered I had made tomato soup,- naughty naughty.
I think next time I will read the guidance,before I start cooking.

In my defence, I only made soup with the left over tomatoes from making chutney. I very rarely eat tomatoes normally.
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Old 12-12-2017, 09:04 PM   #19
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

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Originally Posted by Wobbly Pat View Post
I was feeling very smug today when I produced a soup which seemed to tick all the macrobiotic boxes. High in grains, bought from a registered organic shop.
Lots of home grown vegetables and herbs, cooked with no oil or fat of any description.
I then (belatedly) read my macrobiotic guidance, and discovered I had made tomato soup,- naughty naughty.
I think next time I will read the guidance,before I start cooking.

In my defence, I only made soup with the left over tomatoes from making chutney. I very rarely eat tomatoes normally.
High in grains, home grown vegetables and herbs... sounds like a good start. I know..... read before you cook.... still, appreciate the good parts and learn from the not-so-good.
__________________
"If you don't know what to do, do nothing. If you don't know what to eat, eat nothing." My favorite quote. If only I can get this in writing. To be fair, the discussion that preceded the quote was about not settling because you don't like your choices. You should find a good choice for you.


"Anybody who goes to bed the same day they got up is a quitter."
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Old 12-13-2017, 04:51 AM   #20
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

It did taste good!
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Old 12-13-2017, 07:48 PM   #21
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Sometimes it's looking at what you have changed and seeing this as a journey. Celebrate the wins, learn as you go.
__________________
"If you don't know what to do, do nothing. If you don't know what to eat, eat nothing." My favorite quote. If only I can get this in writing. To be fair, the discussion that preceded the quote was about not settling because you don't like your choices. You should find a good choice for you.


"Anybody who goes to bed the same day they got up is a quitter."
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Old 12-17-2017, 06:56 PM   #22
Ludlum'sDaughter14
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wobbly Pat View Post
I was feeling very smug today when I produced a soup which seemed to tick all the macrobiotic boxes. High in grains, bought from a registered organic shop.
Lots of home grown vegetables and herbs, cooked with no oil or fat of any description.
I then (belatedly) read my macrobiotic guidance, and discovered I had made tomato soup,- naughty naughty.
I think next time I will read the guidance,before I start cooking.

In my defence, I only made soup with the left over tomatoes from making chutney. I very rarely eat tomatoes normally.
Sometimes, it's the thought that counts.
__________________
"The tantalizing discomfort of perplexity is what inspires otherwise ordinary men and women to extraordinary feats of ingenuity and creativity; nothing quite focuses the mind like dissonant details awaiting harmonious resolution."
- Brian Greene
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Old 11-27-2020, 01:15 PM   #23
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Default Re: A Macrobiotic Library

Just wanted to say thank you for doing this Ludlem'sDaughter14 - I found your list and reviews really helpful. Thank you!

Last edited by Lynn; 11-27-2020 at 01:16 PM.. Reason: Hadn't finished!
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